Tag Archives: travel food

A Turkish Breakfast

After eating delicious Turkish breakfasts for two weeks, when we returned home we started to go through withdrawal.  So we decided to make our own!

Below is a photo of the breakfast spread we were treated to every day – can you handle all this goodness?  Fresh, healthy and filling, a Turkish breakfast is the best way to kick start your day.  I love the relaxed nature of the spread – every day I would assemble something different.  Should I make a little tomato and cheese sandwich today?  Meat and cucumber?  How about everything?  And olives!  So many olives.

Homemade Turkish breakfast

Homemade Turkish breakfast

My boyfriend and I attempted our version of a Turkish breakfast, complete with Turkish coffee and an Ottoman trivet!  I think this is going to become a regular weekend breakfast treat.  So easy to put together and this breakfast kept us going all day on a busy Saturday until dinnertime.  I love how we brought some of Turkey back home with us.

Homemade Turkish breakfast

Homemade Turkish breakfast

Turkish Breakfast

51

Prep Time: 20 minutes

Yield: 2 servings

Turkish Breakfast

Ingredients

  • 2 boiled eggs
  • Espresso or Turkish coffee
  • 1/4 of a cucumber sliced into 8 slices
  • 1 hot house tomato sliced into 8 slices
  • 8 slices of cured meat (salami, soppressata)
  • *optional: Turkish white cheese sliced into 4 slices
  • 1/2 cup of granola
  • 4 tablespoons plain Greek yogurt
  • 4 strawberries or other fresh fruit, sliced into quarters
  • 2 tablespoons dried fruit such as raisins or apricots
  • 2 teaspoons raw or buckwheat honey
  • 8 olives - any variety
  • 2 fresh buns, sliced in half
  • Jam
  • Tahini or sunflower butter
  • Fresh juice (mango, cherry, apricot)

Instructions

  1. Prepare espresso or Turkish coffee.
  2. Place eggs in a large saucepan and cover them with cool water by 1 inch.
  3. Bring water to a boil over medium heat.
  4. When the water has reached a boil, cover and remove from heat. Let stand 12 minutes. Place in egg holders.
  5. Slice cucumber, tomato, cured meat & cheese and divide between two serving plates.
  6. Divide granola into two small bowls. Top each bowl with 2 tablespoons of Greek yogurt, 8 slices of strawberries, 1 tablespoon of dried fruit and a teaspoon of honey.
  7. Place one bun on each plate.
  8. Divide olives into two small bowls and place one on each plate.
  9. Serve along with jam, tahini, juice and coffee.
http://iseehungrypeople.net/2016/04/11/a-turkish-breakfast/

Turkey in 2 Weeks – Day 12: Göreme

We left Antalya on an overnight bus, bracing ourselves for another long, hot ride.   The bus tried to drop us off before our ticketed destination – a warning I had read about – but luckily there were these two German girls on our bus who wouldn’t have any of it and forced the bus to drive to the proper stop.  Nine hours later, we arrived bright and early in Goreme, a little town in Cappadocia known as the “cave city”.  The town is built in and around high honey coloured rocks and cave formations that make up the Cappadocia landscape.   The lunar topography is right out of a sci-fi movie and is made out of volcanic ash moulded by millenia of rain and flowing rivers.

Goreme. Cappadocia, Turkey

Goreme. Cappadocia, Turkey

We stayed in the Oriental Cave hotel (review on Trip Advisor), a spacious, cavernous historical hotel with a lovely rooftop terrace, many oriental rugs and a very cute kitten named Susu.

Oriental Cave Hotel, Goreme, Cappadocia, Turkey

Oriental Cave Hotel, Goreme, Cappadocia, Turkey

"Me & Susu" Oriental Cave Hotel, Goreme, Turkey

“Me & Susu” Oriental Cave Hotel, Goreme, Turkey

Selime, Cappadocia, Turkey

Selime, Cappadocia, Turkey

The hotel manager was super nice and arranged a bus tour for us.  For 60TL we booked a full day tour with Insider Tours.  We had such an amazing guide – he was so passionate, knowledgeable and hospitable – and he would address the tour by saying “dear friends” – I’ll always remember him!

Selime, Cappadocia, Turkey

Selime, Cappadocia, Turkey

Our first stop was the cave town of Selime, once used by the Selcuks as a check tower and refuge.  We roamed around and explored the caves and saw how they had carved out various rooms and crevices for cooking, storing food and dining.

Selime, Cappadocia, Turkey

Selime, Cappadocia, Turkey

Most impressive were the domed churches, chapels and basilicas that were carved into the caves complete with columns and painted frescoes.

Selime, Cappadocia, Turkey

Selime, Cappadocia, Turkey

Selime, Cappadocia, Turkey

Selime, Cappadocia, Turkey

Selime, Cappadocia, Turkey

Selime, Cappadocia, Turkey

Ihlara Valley, Cappadocia, Turkey

Ihlara Valley, Cappadocia, Turkey

In the afternoon we hiked through the very pretty Ihlara Valley.  Once a retreat for Byzantine monks, we saw how they had carved churches into the cliffs that lined the valley.

Ihlara Valley, Cappadocia, Turkey

Ihlara Valley, Cappadocia, Turkey

Ihlara Valley, Cappadocia, Turkey

Ihlara Valley, Cappadocia, Turkey

We rested on some tree stumps by the river and took a break, welcoming the freshly squeezed orange juice to quench our thirst.

Ihlara Valley, Cappadocia, Turkey

Ihlara Valley, Cappadocia, Turkey

Ihlara Valley, Cappadocia, Turkey

Ihlara Valley, Cappadocia, Turkey

Ihlara Valley, Cappadocia, Turkey

Ihlara Valley, Cappadocia, Turkey

The hike ended by these little tea huts where we had some delicious lamb stew for lunch.  I love Turkish food so much!  I don’t think I’ve had the same meal twice throughout our entire trip.

Ihlara Valley, Cappadocia, Turkey

Ihlara Valley, Cappadocia, Turkey

Our last stop of the day was the Underground City, which was SO cool.  There are 7 levels of underground tunnels, but only a few accessible to the public.  The network of tunnels were carved out by the Byzantine Christians during the 6th and 7th centuries.  They acted as a refuge for the Christians from the Persian and Arab armies, and they would live in them for months at a time.  We had fun clamouring through all the winding tunnels, imagining what it must have been like to live down below.

Underground City, Cappadocia, Turkey

Underground City, Cappadocia, Turkey

There was even a graveyard in the Underground City (so creepy!) and I sat in an empty grave for the full experience.  We also passed through a baptism area where you had to circle through a tunnel seven times to cleanse yourself of the seven deadly sins.  I’m all good to go!

Graveyard in the Underground City, Goreme, Cappadocia

Graveyard in the Underground City, Goreme, Cappadocia

Uchisar, Cappadocia, Turkey

Uchisar, Cappadocia, Turkey

We passed through little town of Uchisar where we stopped at a precious rock & jewel factory.  I was more interested in the view then all the expensive stones.

Lamb shank, Koy Evi, Goreme, Cappadocia, Turkey

Lamb shank, Koy Evi, Goreme, Cappadocia, Turkey

That evening we had an absolutely amazing dinner – check out this leg of lamb!  The meat just fell off the bone and into my mouth.  I think we’ve consumed an entire lamb on our trip. Our delicious dinner was topped with a gorgeous view of Goreme at night.

Goreme, Cappadocia, Turkey

Goreme, Cappadocia, Turkey

Turkey In 2 Weeks: Day 5 – Pamukkale

We headed east on our 5th day in Turkey, hopping on a 9:30AM bus from Selcuk that would take us to Pamukkale, a small village in Central Anatolia.  We arrived around lunch time, dropped our packs off at the Venus Hotel (check out my Trip Advisor review) and headed out to the main attraction in Pamukkale: the “Cotton Castle”.

Just a few minutes from the main village lies a mountainous formation of calcite travertines, that you can climb or take a break and soak in the mineral-rich terraces.  The gleaming white calcite is blinding beautiful, and exploring the many crevices while taking in a panoramic view of the village was a most relaxing way to spend the afternoon.

"Cotton Castle" - Pamukkale, Turkey

“Cotton Castle” – Pamukkale, Turkey

"Cotton Castle" - Pamukkale, Turkey

“Cotton Castle” – Pamukkale, Turkey

"Cotton Castle" - Pamukkale, Turkey

“Cotton Castle” – Pamukkale, Turkey

"Cotton Castle" - Pamukkale, Turkey

“Cotton Castle” – Pamukkale, Turkey

"Cotton Castle" - Pamukkale, Turkey

“Cotton Castle” – Pamukkale, Turkey

"Cotton Castle" - Pamukkale, Turkey

“Cotton Castle” – Pamukkale, Turkey

"Cotton Castle" - Pamukkale, Turkey

“Cotton Castle” – Pamukkale, Turkey

"Cotton Castle" - Pamukkale, Turkey

“Cotton Castle” – Pamukkale, Turkey

"Cotton Castle" - Pamukkale, Turkey

“Cotton Castle” – Pamukkale, Turkey

"Cotton Castle" - Pamukkale, Turkey

“Cotton Castle” – Pamukkale, Turkey

Denizli Horozu, Pamukkale, Turkey

Denizli Horozu, Pamukkale, Turkey

After climbing up over the travertines, we came upon the archaeological site of Hierapolis.  Founded in 190 BC by Eumenes II of Pergamum, Hierapolis prospered under the Byzantines and Romans.  Greeks, Romans, Jews, pagans and Christians co-existed in this city for years until an earthquake in 1334 destroyed the city and was promptly abandoned.

Hierapolis - Pamukkale, Turkey

Hierapolis – Pamukkale, Turkey

Hierapolis - Pamukkale, Turkey

Hierapolis – Pamukkale, Turkey

Hierapolis was one of my favourite sites to explore on our trip.  The grounds were so peaceful and their were hardly any tourists so we could really relax and explore the ruins.  Some were impressive like grand theatre below. I sat for an hour or so drawing in the sun and admiring the view.

Hierapolis - Pamukkale, Turkey

Hierapolis – Pamukkale, Turkey

Most of the other ruins are scattered throughout this stunning countryside, full of flowing grass, winding pathways and patches of tall forested trees.  The scenery reminded me of Scotland a little and once again I admired how diversely fascinating Turkey was.

Hierapolis - Pamukkale, Turkey

Hierapolis – Pamukkale, Turkey

Hierapolis - Pamukkale, Turkey

Hierapolis – Pamukkale, Turkey

Hierapolis - Pamukkale, Turkey

Hierapolis – Pamukkale, Turkey

The Cathedral, Hierapolis - Pamukkale, Turkey

The Cathedral, Hierapolis – Pamukkale, Turkey

The Nymphaeum of the Triton, Hierapolis - Pamukkale, Turkey

The Nymphaeum of the Triton, Hierapolis – Pamukkale, Turkey

The Nymphaeum of the Triton, Hierapolis - Pamukkale, Turkey

The Nymphaeum of the Triton, Hierapolis – Pamukkale, Turkey

Hierapolis - Pamukkale, Turkey

Hierapolis – Pamukkale, Turkey

As magic hour approached, we passed by a forest that was full of birds chirping filling the air with music.  In that moment, we were surrounded by peace and beauty.

Hierapolis - Pamukkale, Turkey

Hierapolis – Pamukkale, Turkey

Tomb A18, Hierapolis - Pamukkale, Turkey

Tomb A18, Hierapolis – Pamukkale, Turkey

Hierapolis - Pamukkale, Turkey

Hierapolis – Pamukkale, Turkey

We walked back over the travertines as the sun began to set.  This was one of my favourite days in Turkey, the day was the perfect balance of adventure, relaxing, exploration and inspiration.

"Cotton Castle" - Pamukkale, Turkey

“Cotton Castle” – Pamukkale, Turkey

"Cotton Castle" - Pamukkale, Turkey

“Cotton Castle” – Pamukkale, Turkey

"Cotton Castle" - Pamukkale, Turkey

“Cotton Castle” – Pamukkale, Turkey

"Cotton Castle" - Pamukkale, Turkey

“Cotton Castle” – Pamukkale, Turkey

That evening we ate dinner at the hotel.  I wish we could have stayed a little bit longer as the hotel itself was very charming and their pool looked so inviting after a day in the sun.  We devoured our clay lamb pot meal that was paired with a local wine.  A perfect way to end an amazing day.

Clay Pot Lamb, Venus Hotel Restaurant - Pamukkale, Turkey

Clay Pot Lamb, Venus Hotel Restaurant – Pamukkale, Turkey